“Where’s more grease rags?”  
 
This question posed by a son got me to thinking: Does anyone have a rag bag anymore?   
 
When I was growing up every household had a ‘rag bag’. It was just a part of life in the years right after World War II.  Folks spent the war years saving everything for ‘drives’ to help out the war effort and paper, tin cans and rags were just a part of the effort. And you thought ‘recycling’ just began in the 1960’s.

Cloth of any kind went through a lot of stages before ending up in the rag bag. Absolutely no item of clothing was thrown away just because it was the wrong color or style and if it didn’t fit you, you found someone the item did fit, and gave it to them.

Holes in clothes were carefully mended and if a person in the household was a very good seamstress, the garment could be taken apart and remade into a new garment, often for someone of a smaller size.

Suits, coats and jackets were taken apart, cut into strips and braided. The coils of braids were then sewed into rugs to keep floors warmer in winter. Quilts were made from the ‘good pieces’ of worn out garments such as shirts, skirts, curtains, etc. and these heavy quilts were placed on the beds during the winter months.

Odds and ends of fabric pieces such as worn towels were used as ‘scrub rags’ for floors, walls, etc. instead of buying new rags.

Let’s face it – every home has the beginnings of a ‘rag bag’.  It’s a whole lot easier on the budget to use that old towel for a floor mop for everyday cleaning and save those dollars for something else you really need.
 
Used rags can be cleaned in the washing machine with soapsuds and a little disinfectant such as bleach. Easy, and very cost effective.

I am told that nowadays there are factories that take old clothing and shred it for use in insulating homes. (Might be worth checking into.


 Note from Pennywise:
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