Sometimes the benefits of conservation can be abstract. For example, think a minute about the dollar value of a single tree. Can you come up with a number?

Did you consider that the tree creates oxygen, captures carbon and provides wildlife habitat? Or that the tree serves as a windbreak, shades and cools the surrounding area, and improves water quality? Don’t forget, these benefits extend for many decades over the lifetime of a healthy tree.

It’s easy to focus on measurable data and overlook abstract values. Perhaps the best way to highlight the benefits of conservation is through pictures. →see more BEFORE & AFTER photos

 

ABOVE: This Pennsylvania farmer planted for pollinators, filling his land with flowers. This field attracts honeybees, which then pollinate nearby fruit trees.

 

 

ABOVE: By planting buffers and installing a stream crossing, this Maryland farmer reduced erosion and improved the stream’s water quality.

 

This month USDA will be highlighting the value of conservation with a different focus each week.

Sometimes the benefits of conservation can be abstract. For example, think a minute about the dollar value of a single tree. Can you come up with a number?

Did you consider that the tree creates oxygen, captures carbon and provides wildlife habitat? Or that the tree serves as a windbreak, shades and cools the surrounding area, and improves water quality? Don’t forget, these benefits extend for many decades over the lifetime of a healthy tree.

It’s easy to focus on measurable data and overlook abstract values. Perhaps the best way to highlight the benefits of conservation is through pictures. Below is a series of before/after photos of the good conservation can accomplish.

Soil health and water quality are often related.

– See more at: http://blogs.usda.gov/2014/05/06/picture-it-conservation/#more-51689

This month USDA will be highlighting the value of conservation with a different focus each week.

Sometimes the benefits of conservation can be abstract. For example, think a minute about the dollar value of a single tree. Can you come up with a number?

Did you consider that the tree creates oxygen, captures carbon and provides wildlife habitat? Or that the tree serves as a windbreak, shades and cools the surrounding area, and improves water quality? Don’t forget, these benefits extend for many decades over the lifetime of a healthy tree.

It’s easy to focus on measurable data and overlook abstract values. Perhaps the best way to highlight the benefits of conservation is through pictures. Below is a series of before/after photos of the good conservation can accomplish.

Soil health and water quality are often related.

– See more at: http://blogs.usda.gov/2014/05/06/picture-it-conservation/#more-51689