Art's Way Manufacturing Co., Inc. announces that Art's-Way Scientific was awarded a 2015 Award of Distinction by the Modular Building Institute (MBI), at the annual MBI World of Modular Conference in Las Vegas, NV.  The award winning modular transgenic swine facility was designed, manufactured and installed for Iowa State University's Zumwalt Station Farm in Ames, IA.

With competition in over 30 categories, MBI's contest is the commercial modular industry's premier awards program for MBI members, which include building manufacturers, dealers, and product and service providers.

"This project is an excellent example of the capability of our team," said Dan Palmer, President of Art's Way Scientific. "This project combines the features of our laboratory animal research experience and our longstanding history of agricultural swine production buildings into a complex for transgenic animals. This building is one of a kind.  We are pleased that it has been chosen for this prestigious award."

Contest entries are relocatable, permanent, and renovated modular buildings as well as industry marketing pieces.  The Art's Way Scientific was awarded an honorable mention in the Permanent Special Application category.

Each entry is reviewed by an impartial panel of industry and non-industry construction and code experts, architects and engineers, and marketing professionals. Building entries are judged on architectural excellence, technical innovation & sustainability, and cost effectiveness, including energy efficiency, and calendar days to complete. The biomedical facility excelled in all three criteria.

Architectural Excellence
Art's Way Scientific was chosen to design, manufacture and install a 2904 SF transgenic swine facility to support studies of Genetic Modification of Domestic Animals for Agricultural and Biomedical Applications.  This standalone facility incorporates biosafety features to protect a closed herd of special swine used in research.  Comprised of two 16' 6" x 88' modules it includes a double shower through entry, changing rooms, laundry, restroom, storage, preheat, biohazard filter area and 2178 SF of animal housing space.  Cast iron slatted hog flooring supported over a sealed pit with scraper system allows sanitary waste management and removal.  Structural insulated panels provide a sealed envelope, with sound attenuation properties, finished with steel siding to match existing campus structures.  The interior surfaces are finished with an anti-bacterial, seamless, fiberglass reinforced epoxy coating system.  Insulated doors and windows are used to monitor animal activity and the environment.

Technical Innovation & Sustainability
Following the Guide for the Care and Use of Agricultural Animals in Research and Teaching, 3rd edition, flexible stainless steel pens were used to provide a social animal environment for individual, paired or group housed animals.  Special emphasis was given to the ventilation system, which includes MERV 8 supply filters, cascading positive pressure air flows and differential pressure from room to room, all with the purpose of creating an environment to maximize animal health and welfare.  Room heat is supplied by thermostatically control heaters, tied to a multi-stage agricultural control system.  Digital temp and RH sensors monitor temperature, humidity and air flow.  Water resistant electrical components including PVC conduit, NEMA 3 panels, and wet environment fixtures are used.  Animal drinking water is supplied by ¾" PEX through pressure reducing and medication stations to animal water cups.  Surface mounted power and water systems allow flexibility if the research requirements change.

Cost Effectiveness
By utilizing the modular solution for agricultural animal research programs, the client recognized a 50% time savings compared to traditional construction.  Having research ready animals close at hand allows the University to avoid acquiring animals from other sources, and the associated transportation costs, plus allows the local veterinarian to monitor the health status of the animals throughout their entire life.  As compared to a site built facility, the University gained this space for approximately half the cost of traditional ABSL2 site built facilities.  Factory construction and testing of critical environmental systems reduce startup labor and provides the owner with a "research ready" facility.  The building design eliminated the need for bedding purchase, handling and disposal.  Foundation and infrastructure costs of $25,000 are 60-70% less than that of a site built structure.