Author: admin

The Hunt

Venison is so much a member of the red meat group that it is nearly impossible to come upon the deer hunting season without comment — especially when it involves family, who have evolved into students of the trade.   They, like most others simply took for granted that every venison processor is qualified about the actual process of cutting and wrapping venison. This became apparent in my college years at NDSU, and really driven home when my two daughters married avid hunters. They married brothers, and neither had ever been exposed to the fine art of venison cuisine. It was chop/chop without much attention to detail, particularly that of wholesomeness and health related inspection issues. This was a challenge that I couldn’t let pass, so I put on my teaching hat and drifted back in time to that vintage period of university meat labs. I’m proud to point out that the Kinneman brothers turned out to be my finest students of the trade. You probably have it figured out that the Kinneman brothers are my sons-in-law, and they have now joined their younger brother in the business of Kinneman Bros. Venison Meat Processing. The kinship of the Kinnemans (including 4 grandchildren) is an inordinate relationship, uncomparable to that of any other. They have such a passion for the sport; that to take it to the next level seemed only...

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Students Of The Hunt

There is no greater honor than to be emulated by your peers or family members. It probably becomes even closer than that, when it’s your son’s-in-law. They represent a new chapter in your life that will forever change both yours and theirs. These relationships started long before they were married to my daughters, Deb & Pam. They were courting Ron and Randy (brothers), and instead of whispering sweet nothing’s in their ear—they must have whispered a secret about their Dad’s knowledge about meat processing. That was about 30 years ago, and the brothers have done nothing but get bigger and more sophisticated in their meat processing skills. It intrigued their younger brother so much that he went on to study at a certified meat processing school, and is now the boss of the operation (Kinneman Bros. Deer Processing). I thought our good father/son relationship was all about me, but it didn’t take long to find out it was more about what I could teach them about deer processing. The boys are serious, passionate deer hunters, so any skills I could bring to the table were welcomed with open arms. Again, I thought it was just a warm embrace; little did I know they were grabbing for a knife with their other hand; not just any knife, for they were soon to learn the value of sharp and presentation. Their...

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You think you have an estate plan!

Dear Just Got Finished: Currently, I am sitting at my booth in at the Big Iron Show in Fargo for my eighteenth or nineteenth year. As usual, I’m watching all the passer-byes go by – some looking at me, some avoiding eye contact, and others stopping to chat. I feel like the little puppy in the window at the pet store watching the world go by. One common thread I hear from the people going by is “I’ve already completed my estate planning (two years ago, five years ago, pick your own number) and I worked with this (attorney, insurance agent, pick your advisor) and he did a really good job”. When I ask them how they set things up, most people kind of shrug their shoulders and grin and say, “I don’t really know” or “I don’t really remember”. Now maybe they’re just giving me the brush off so they don’t have to talk to me, or they are telling me the truth. One thing I’ve found is they truly do believe their estate planning process is done. Let me walk you through a typical first meeting with my clients. After our initial fact gathering, I ask to see the couple’s wills. Ninety-five percent of the time I see a boilerplate will with a couple written paragraphs deviating from the Wills-on-a-Disc software, which you can buy at Staples...

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Guidelines on how rural communities avoid divisive conflict

How do communities resolve conflict on a local level without creating ill-will and controversy? One good test is in the quality of interactions between rural community leaders and constituents in public meetings. How do communities resolve conflict on a local level without creating ill-will and controversy? One good test is in the quality of interactions between rural community leaders and constituents in public meetings.   The opposition materializes. People split into opposite camps. Unfortunately, issues become personalized. Animosity and ill will prevail. Public hearings turn divisive and ugly. The hot rhetoric burns the ears. After a meeting, supporters split into small groups and factions. They rehash what was said and how it was done.   The controversy and feelings continue well past public votes and decisions. Former friends don’t speak. Public leaders who took strong stands feel the wrath of the defeated with social snubs and economic boycotts. Memories are long. The impact sometimes lasts for years.   How to prevent political fallout? Does it have to be this way? Whatever happened to civilized discourse? Can’t people agree to disagree without letting strong emotion get in the way of friendliness and courtesy?   How politically hot topics are handled has a great deal to do with community harmony and cohesiveness. Here are some tips on how communities can avoid the fallout of explosive and corrosive politics.   1. Start early....

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More uses for vinegar, mess-free cooking tips and more

More Uses for Vinegar You can kill grass on walks and driveways by spraying with vinegar. You can kill weeds the same way. Spray vinegar around doorways, appliances and other areas where ants like to roam. Remove skunk odor from a dog by rubbing the fur with full strength vinegar, and then rinse well. Spray vinegar around areas where you don’t want cats to walk, sleep or scratch on. Put a little vinegar in the drinking water of chickens, and they won’t pick at each other. To tenderize a tough piece of meat, soak overnight in pure vinegar Spray sunburned skin with vinegar and it will take out the sting. To dissolve rust from nuts and bolts and other metal repair pieces, soak in full strength vinegar for several days. Then rinse, knock off any remaining rust with a wire brush, dry well and oil the cleaned bolts with some used cooking oil. (We’ve done this for years with the buckets of bolts, nuts and assorted ‘stuff’ purchased at farm auctions.  Cleaned up and sorted into the appropriate bins, they have saved us many dollars and unnecessary trips to town.) To unclog a steam iron, pour a solution of half vinegar and half water into the tank and let the iron heat to steam for 5 or 6 minutes.  Unplug the iron and let it set till just warm. Dump...

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